Tag Archive: ATP

Onboarding older Windows Versions to WD ATP

Today Microsoft announced  that it’s now possible to onboard older legacy operatingsystems to ATP (Advanced Threat Protection) when the public preview that is available.

  • Windows 7 SP1 Enterprise
  • Windows 7 SP1 Pro
  • Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Windows 8.1 Enterprise

Even though we Always recommend using the latest versions there might be scenarios where you need the advanced detection and response capatibilities and  of ATP and it’s not possible to upgrade the machines.

The difference between Windows 10 and the older versions is that is not built-in and you have to install an Microsoft Monitoring agent which will connect to your workspace and report the sensor data.

Installing the agent

64-bit agent is available here:
https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=828603

32-bit agent is available here:
https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=828604

When you have downloaded the setup file you extract it using “/c” parameter

Install command
setup.exe /qn NOAPM=1 ADD_OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE=1 OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE_AZURE_CLOUD_TYPE=0 OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE_ID= OPINSIGHTS_WORKSPACE_KEY= AcceptEndUserLicenseAgreement=1

The workspace ID and Key is available in your ATP Portal https://securitycenter.windows.com

 

The clients will connect to the service using HTTPS and can be a direct connection or through a proxy or OMS gateway.

Agent Resource Ports
*.oms.opinsights.azure.com 443
*.blob.core.windows.net 443
*.azure-automation.net 443
*.ods.opinsights.azure.com 443
winatp-gw-cus.microsoft.com 443
winatp-gw-eus.microsoft.com 443
winatp-gw-neu.microsoft.com 443
winatp-gw-weu.microsoft.com 443
winatp-gw-uks.microsoft.com 443
winatp-gw-ukw.microsoft.com 443

 

When your clients are configured you should start seeing them in the ATP console

As you may have noticed there’s a link to Azure ATP alerts where you can dig further on advanced attacks in your environment.

On the following link you can find more information about onboarding older Windows Versions to Defender ATP
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/windows-defender-atp/onboard-downlevel-windows-defender-advanced-threat-protection

Happy Hunting

 

/SEC-LABS R&D

 

 

Controlling Auto Forward Rules of Emails to avoid data leakage

Email Forwarding is a challenge when it comes to modern attacks, and it was recently used as one of the tools in a crimecase in Sweden. Basically the attackers forwarded all emails from the victims to themselves to be able to track the victims very easily and to gain insights and data for social engineering attacks. Multifactor auth via e-mail or password reset links where obtained and could easly be used to manipulate and gain access.

Email forwarding can be created in Outlook or the the web application (OWA) by the users or an attacker with access to a user account.

The solution for this is very easy.
You can block email forwarding and redirects in general and allow it where it’s necessary (if you do have that scenario).

Block autoforward domain wide for Office 365 using PowerShell:

Set-RemoteDomain Default -AutoForwardEnabled $false

It is possible to configure this on a per domain basis.
For instance, if you need to allow forward to specific domain.

To view all forwarding rules today both on-prem and cloud you can use the following script.
The only difference is the connection part.

View the Rules

Function Get-AutoForwardRules
{
foreach ($a in (Get-Mailbox -ResultSize Unlimited |select PrimarySMTPAddress))
{
Get-InboxRule -Mailbox $a.PrimarySMTPAddress |
?{($_.ForwardTo -ne $null) -or ($_.ForwardAsAttachmentTo -ne $null) -or ($_.DeleteMessage -eq $true) -or ($_.RedirectTo -ne $null)} |
select Name,Identity,ForwardTo,ForwardAsAttachmentTo, RedirectTo, DeleteMessage
}
}

#Example

Get-AutoForwardRules

To get the PowerShell module for office 365 which supports MFA.

Download the PowerShell Module (available in the 365 admin portal)

Connect using: Connect-EXOPSSession -UserPrincipalName user@example.com

Security Features in Office 365

Depending on your Office 365 Subscription you might get a warning email when someone tries to define a forwarding rule

 

This is an example for Exchange Online

$Mailboxes = Get-Mailbox -ResultSize "Unlimited"
$Count = 1
ForEach ($Mailbox in $Mailboxes)
{
Write-Progress -Activity "Checking inboxrules..." -Status "User $($Mailbox.PrimarySmtpAddress) ($count/$($Mailboxes.count))" -PercentComplete ($Count / $Mailboxes.count*100)
$MailboxWithRule = Get-InboxRule -Mailbox $Mailbox.Alias | Where-Object {($_.RedirectTo -ne $null) -and ($_.ForwardTo -ne $null) -and ($_.ForwardAsAttachmentTo -ne $null)}
if ($MailboxWithRule -ne $Null) {
Write-Host "Mailbox $($Mailbox.PrimarySmtpAddress) has these rulez:" $MailboxWithRule |
fl Name, Identity, RedirectTo, ForwardTo, ForwardAsAttachmentTo
}
$count++
}